Configuring Network Interfaces

Network interfaces in the Citrix ADC appliance are numbered in <slot>/<port> notation. After configuring your interfaces, display the interfaces and their settings to verify the configuration. You can also display this information to troubleshoot a problem in the configuration.

To manage the network interfaces, you might have to enable some interfaces and disable others. You can reset an interface to renegotiate its settings. You can clear the accumulated statistics for an interface. To verify the configuration, you can display the interface settings. You can display the statistics for an interface to evaluate its health.

Set the network interface parameters

The network interface configuration is neither synchronized nor propagated. For an HA pair, you must perform the configuration on each unit independently.

To set the network interface parameters by using the CLI:

At the command prompt, type:

-  set interface <id> [-speed <speed>] [-duplex <duplex>] [-flowControl <flowControl>] [-autoneg ( DISABLED | ENABLED )] [-haMonitor ( ON | OFF )] [ ( ON | OFF )] [-tagall ( ON | OFF )] [-lacpMode <lacpMode>] [-lacpKey<positive_integer>] [-lacpPriority <positive_integer>] [-lacpTimeout (LONG | SHORT )] [-ifAlias <string>] [-throughput <positive_integer>][-bandwidthHigh <positive_integer> [-bandwidthNormal <positive_integer>]]
-  show interface [<id>]

Example:

> set interface 1/8 -duplex full
 Done

To set the network interface parameters by using the GUI:

Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces, select the network interface that you want to modify (for example, 1/8), click Edit, and then set the parameters.

Set the receive ring size and ring type for an interface

You can increase the receive ring size and ring type for IX, F1X, F2X, or F4X interfaces on Citrix ADC MPX and SDX platforms.

An increased ring size provides more cushion to handle burst traffic, but might impact the performance. A ring size of up to 8192 is supported for IX interfaces. A ring size of up to 4096 is supported for F1X, F2X, and F4X interfaces. The default ring size remains 2048.

Interface ring types are elastic by default. They increase or decrease in size based on packet arrival rate. You can configure the ring type as “fixed” in which case the ring size does not change based on traffic rate.

Note: This feature is supported from release 13.0 build 41.x, and supported on platforms that have IX, F1X, F2X, or F4X interfaces.

Use the show hardware command to identify whether your appliance has IX, F1X, F2X, or F4X interfaces.

Examples:

The following model has 16 F1X (10G) interfaces and 4 F4X (40G) interfaces.

> sh hardware
        Platform: NSMPX-25000-40G 20*CPU+16*F1X+4*F4X+2*E1K+2*CVM N3 250040
        Manufactured on: 12/16/2016
        CPU: 2800MHZ
        Host Id: 234913926
        Serial no: N43RJCRV3X
        Encoded serial no: N43RJCRV3X
        Netscaler UUID: 336a32d6-2cfa-11e8-bf01-00e0ed5dd23c
        BMC Revision: 4.08
 Done

The following model has 2 1X (10G) interfaces.

> sh hardware
        Platform: NSMPX-10500 8*CPU+2*E1K+8*E1K+2*IX+8*CVM 1620 760100
        Manufactured on: 12/27/2010
        CPU: 2832MHZ
        Host Id: 1707114630
        Serial no: 7VZZV1ZXJ4
        Encoded serial no: 7VZZV1ZXJ4
        Netscaler UUID: eb1bfd72-5176-11e7-ba18-00e0ed1b0d12
 Done

To configure ring size and ring type by using the CLI At the command line, type:

set interface <id> -ringsize <positive_integer> -ringtype ( Elastic | Fixed )

Parameters:

ringsize:

The receive ring size of the interface. A higher number provides more buffers to handle incoming traffic.

Default value: 2048 Minimum value: 512 Maximum value: 16384

ringtype:

The receive ring type of the interface. A fixed ring type preallocates the configured number of buffers irrespective of traffic rate. In contrast, an elastic ring, expands and shrinks based on incoming traffic rate.

Possible values: Elastic, Fixed

Default value: Elastic

Example:

> set interface 40/2 -ringsize 4096 -ringtype Fixed
 Done
> show interface 40/2

1)      Interface 40/2 (40G Ethernet, CR4, 40 Gbit) #21  flags=0xc020 <ENABLED, UP, UP, autoneg, HAMON, HEARTBEAT, 802.1q> MTU=1500, native vlan=10, MAC=00:e0:ed:75:14:2a, uptime 119h26m32s
        Requested: media AUTO, speed AUTO, duplex AUTO, fctl OFF,throughput 0
        Actual: media UTP, speed 40000, duplex FULL, fctl OFF, throughput 40000
        LLDP Mode: NONE, LR Priority: 1024
        RX: Pkts(1443972660032) Bytes(1457207315336105) Errs(0) Drops(53319) Stalls(0)
        TX: Pkts(1452311431262) Bytes(1458534011197761) Errs(0) Drops(788) Stalls(0)
        NIC: InDisc(0) OutDisc(0) Fctls(0) Stalls(0) Hangs(0) Muted(0)
        Bandwidth thresholds are not set.
        Rx Ring: Configured size=4096, Actual size=4096, Type: Fixed
 Done

The last line shows the configured and actual ring size, and the ring type.

To configure ring size and ring type by using the GUI:

  1. Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces.
  2. Select your interface and click Edit.
  3. In Ring Size, specify one of the following:

    IX interfaces: 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, or 8192.

    F1X, F2X, or F4X interfaces: 512, 1024, 2048, or 4096.

  4. In Ring Type, select Elastic or Fixed.
  5. Click OK.

Enabling and Disabling Network Interfaces

By default, the network interfaces are enabled. You must disable any network interface that is not connected to the network, so that it cannot send or receive packets. Disabling a network interface that is connected to the network in a high availability setup can cause a failover.

For more information about high availability, see High Availability.

To enable or disable a network interface by using the CLI:

At the command prompt, type:

  • enable interface
  • show interface
  • disable interface
  • show interface

Example:


> enable interface 1/8
 Done
> show interface 1/8
        Interface 1/8 (Gig Ethernet 10/100/1000 MBits) #2
        flags=0x4004000 <ENABLED, DOWN, BOUND to LA/1, down, autoneg, 802.1q>
        MTU=1514, MAC=00:d0:68:15:fd:3d, downtime 906h58m40s
        Requested: media UTP, speed AUTO, duplex FULL, fctl OFF, throughput 0
        RX: Pkts(0) Bytes(0) Errs(0) Drops(0) Stalls(0)
        TX: Pkts(0) Bytes(0) Errs(0) Drops(0) Stalls(0)
        NIC: InDisc(0) OutDisc(0) Fctls(0) Stalls(0) Hangs(0) Muted(0)
        Bandwidth thresholds are not set.
Done

To enable or disable a network interface by using the GUI:

  1. Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces.
  2. Select the network interface and, in the Action list, select Enable or Disable.

Resetting Network Interfaces

Network interface settings control properties such as duplex and speed. To renegotiate the settings of a network interface, you must reset it.

To reset a network interface by using the CLI:

At the command prompt, type:

  • reset interface
  • show interface

Example:

> reset interface 1/8
 Done

To reset a network interface by using the GUI:

  1. Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces.
  2. Select the network interface and, in the Action list, select Reset Interface.

Monitoring a Network Interface

You can display network interface statistics to monitor parameters such as packets sent and packets received, throughput, Link Aggregate Control Protocol (LACP) data units, and errors, and use the information to check the health of the network interface. You can clear the statistics of a network interface to monitor its statistics from the time the statistics are cleared.

To display the statistics of the network interfaces by using the CLI:

At the command prompt, type:

  • stat interface

Example:

> stat interface 1/8
 Done

To clear a network interface’s statistics by using the CLI:

At the command prompt, type:

  • clear interface

Example:

> clear interface 1/8
 Done

To display the statistics of an Interface by using the GUI:

Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces, select the network interface, and click Interface Statistics.

To clear a network interface’s statistics by using the GUI:

  1. Navigate to System > Network > Interfaces.
  2. Select the network interface and, in the Action list, select Clear Statistics.